Updates archive

29/10/15 

Sexuality, development and non-conforming desire in the Arab World. A new IDS report added to the toolkit explores social attitudes and sexual rights activism in Egypt and Lebanon. 

25/10/15 

Gender, sexuality and the SDGs. Elizabeth Mills highlights the importance of language in the post-2015 framework, evidence on gender and sexuality and the roles of institutions and governments.

25/10/15 

'Leave No One behind'. This recent addition to the toolkit highlights that billions of people could be excluded from international development and the SDGs because of their sexual orientation and gender identity.

14/10/15 

'You cannot eat rights'. This article, added to the toolkit, is a qualitative study of the views of Zambian HIV-vulnerable women, youth and men who have sex with men, in relation to human rights and public health.

14/10/15 

Ending violence against sexual and gender minority women. This blog post, recently added to the toolkit, discusses violence against Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender women as a multi-faceted development issue. 

30/09/15 

Sexuality, poverty and the law: Exploring change. A paper has been added to the toolkit which explores the challenge of using practice based evidence to learn more about the impact of policy related work.

30/09/15 

Effective strategies for sex work, law and poverty. A new IDS policy brief has been added to the toolkit which tackles many of the issues around the welfare of female sex workers in low-income countries.

30/09/15 

Lessons in activism from Vishtar. This recent addition to the toolkit provides background on a number of tools for advocacy and social mobilisation, direct action and community transformation.

30/09/15 

Launch of the Sex Work Law Map. Kate Hawkins was following the conversation around sex work, the law and the rights of sex workers at the recent launch of the Sex Work Law Map in London. 

28/09/15 

The myth of gay affluence. An article has been added to the toolkit arguing that mainstream activism has overlooked the majority of LGBT/Q people who are poor or working class, female, and people of colour.

Pages